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Cell Phones for Kids, in Weal or Woe?给孩子手机,是福还是祸?  

2009-12-03 13:38:17|  分类: 家长论坛 |  标签: |举报 |字号 订阅

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Cell Phones for Kids, in Weal or Woe?
给孩子手机,是福还是祸?

Most families get their kids cell phones to keep in touch and to know that they are safe, but most of us know that kids use their cell phones to keep in touch with their friends. You don’t have to look much further than your local middle school to see evidence of that.

Ever since the 1)Anchorage district give the OK for cell phones at school, these 2)roaming middle school students have been happily talking and texting their lunch hours away. 13-year-old John Eyrich is one of them. He says it took a while to 3)convince his mom he just had to have a cell phone.

John Eyrich: I needed one. I wanted one. And I finally got one.

And it turns out John is not alone.

Susan LaGrande: The number one way in surveys that…kids that they get their cell phones begging them from their parents.

Susan LaGrande is a child 4)psychologist who says cell phones are 5)a fact of life. But that doesn’t mean kids or their parents should 6)take that fact for granted.

LaGrande: Parents need to know this is just the same kind of setting limits as anything else like 7)curfews or when you can drive the car or anything like that. You still have to set limits.

LaGrande gives simply advice on when you give your kids a cell phone. Make the rules very clear and if they break the rules let them know the 8)consequences. Parents should keep in mind the age of their child—the very young may need a lesson on how to call for help.

LaGrande: One of the concerns is that the safety, we found. Here is…you know, in your phone is a helpful friend’s number beyond our number in case you can’t reach us. This is how you call 911. This is when you call 911. You don’t call them because we’re…we’re late picking you up. You call them because someone’s trying to harm you.

And for older kids, safety counts too. LaGrande says parents shouldn’t hesitate to keep an eye on who their children are talking to.

LaGrande: Sit down with them and tell them that you are going to check who they have phone calls with; and you are gonna go over the monthly bill with them. And if there are unfamiliar numbers that are frequently used, you wanna know what those…whose… those numbers are too.

LaGrande says cell phones are a great way to give parents peace of mind but the phones can also be a teaching tool, allowing children to learn about taking responsibility and showing they can handle it.

Clip 2

And if you think we’re kidding, when we say “thousands of times a month”, listen to what some teens are telling us. The numbers will surprise you.

Student A: I text a lot but not as much as some.

Reporter: So what’s “a lot”?

Student B: Uh…in the past two weeks, in my outbox now I’ve sent 3,000.

Student C: Well, last month was about 6,000 but this month there are probably like 2-3 maybe.

Student D: I have unlimited. So, last month there was 7,000.

And then there is Andrew Carrao. Listen to this—

Andrew Carrao: Yes, in last month I sent 11,263.

That’s 11,263 text messages in one month on that phone.

Carrao: So if I’m just saying something to someone and I’m joking, I’ll just say “JK”—just kidding; and if I’m about to leave or to go to the bathroom or something and I’m gonna come back, I’ll say “BRB” which means “be right back.”

Christina Gaebhart: I think a lot of it is just generational thing.

Teacher Christina Gaebhart has followed the trend and how a whole new language has developed, a sort of text messages shorthand. 9)Abbreviations like OMG, and PAW, and TMI, mean “Oh My God”, “Parents Are Watching” and “Too Much Information”. And there’s dozens more just like them. But when these codes show up in actual classroom work—

Derek Noll: It’s a little 10)frustrating.

Derek Noll is an Oak Park English teacher.

Noll: Well you know, you see the number “2” instead of the “to” or “too” or “two” even, in just inappropriate places.

Teachers also watch for cheating by text message.

Gaebhart: I know a lot of teachers are worried about cheating. And how easy it is for one kid who can be taking a quiz right now to text to the kid who is gonna take that quiz next 11)block.

Reporter: And what do you do about that?

Gaebhart: Uh…for me I make sure that there is nothing on the tables when they’re doing it.

In this school, and others, it’s a “use it and lose it” policy—get caught using a cell phone during class, and teachers will take them away.

片断一
      对于大多数家庭来说,给他们的孩子买手机是为了保持联络和知道他们是否安全,但我们很多人都知道孩子们使用手机是为了跟他们的朋友联络。您不用到很远的地方去找例子,在您附近的中学便可见一斑了。

     自从安克雷奇地区允许学生携带手机上学以来,这群在校园内游荡的中学生一直很开心地打电话聊天和发短信,就此打发午饭时间。13岁的约翰·艾瑞奇便是代表之一。他说他花了好一段时间才说服他妈妈自己必须有一部手机。

约翰·艾瑞奇:我需要一个(手机)。我想要一个(手机)。然后最终我都得到了一个(手机)。

     看来约翰的例子并不在少数。

苏珊·拉戈兰德:调查显示,排行第一的方式就是……孩子们乞求父母给自己买手机。

     苏珊·拉戈兰德是一位儿童心理学家。她说,拥有手机是个不可改变的生活现实,但这并不是说孩子或是他们的父母就得把这个现实看作理所当然的。

拉戈兰德:家长们必须明白这(指使用手机)跟其它活动,比如宵禁或者子女什么时候可以开车等等,一样要有限度。您仍然必须要设定限度。

     拉戈兰德对什么时候给孩子使用手机提出了简单的建议。做一些非常清楚的规定;如果他们违规了,要让他们知道其后果。家长们要牢记自己孩子的年龄——可能需要指导年纪很小的孩子如何打电话求助。

拉戈兰德:我们发现,考虑因素之一就是安全问题。这里就是……你知道,在你(指子女)的手机里除了我们(指父母)的号码外还要有一个得力的朋友的电话号码,以防你联系不上我们。这就是你如何拨打紧急求助号码911。这就是你何时应该拨打911。你不能因为我们……我们没按时接你放学就打紧急电话号码。而应该是有人要伤害你时才打紧急电话。

     对于年纪大一点的孩子来说,安全同样重要。拉戈兰德说,家长们不应该犹豫,要时刻留意他们的孩子在跟谁通电话。

拉戈兰德:跟他们坐下来,告诉他们您将要检查他们跟谁通电话了,并且您会清查他们每月的电话单。如果有一些陌生号码经常被使用,您也要弄清楚那些……那些号码到底是谁的。

     拉戈兰德说,手机能很好地让家长们安心,但它们也能成为一种教育工具,能让孩子们学会负责任并且展示他们的处理能力。

片断二
     我们说“每个月有数千遍”,如果您觉得我们在开玩笑的话,听听一些青少年是怎么说的。那些数字将会让您吃惊。

学生甲:我发很多短信,但还没有一些人那么多。

记者:那么什么才算“很多”呢?

学生乙:呃……过去两个星期,现在我的发件箱里已经有约3000条信息。

学生丙:嗯,上个月大约发出了6000条,可是这个月也许只发了20003000条吧。

学生丁:我有无数条呢。所以,上个月我发出了7000条。

      接着,是安德鲁·卡里奥。听听这个——

安德鲁·卡里奥:对,上个月我发出了11263条。

      就是在那个手机里一个月内发出了11263条短信。

卡里奥:如果我在跟某人说着什么,而且是说笑的,我会说“JK”——只是开玩笑的意思;或者如果我想离开或者要上洗手间做什么的,我很快便回来的,我就会说“BRB”,意思是“很快回来”。

克里斯汀娜·伽柏霍特:我认为很多这样的现象都只是新一代的特色。

      克里斯汀娜·伽柏霍特老师追踪了这股潮流以及一种崭新的语言——就是所谓的短信速记法怎样形成了。譬如,OMGPAWTMI这样的缩写意为“噢,我的天”,“父母在监视中”以及“信息过多”等等,还有数十个像这样的英文缩写。可是当这些代码出现在现实课堂作业中的时候——

德瑞克·诺尔:这挺让人懊恼的。

德瑞克·诺尔是奥克帕克中学的一位英语老师。

诺尔:嗯,你知道,你会看见数字“2”取代了“to”或“too”,还有“two”,反正就在不恰当的位置出现。

      老师们也监视着用手机短信作弊的行为。

伽柏霍特:我知道很多老师都担心学生作弊。一个现在可能在考试的学生可以轻而易举地发短信给一个下节课将要考同样试题的学生。

记者:对于那种情况你会怎么办呢?

伽柏霍特:嗯……对于我来说,我要保证当他们考试时桌子上什么都没有。

      这所学校以及其它的学校都有一条“发现使用立即没收”的校规,就是如果老师发现学生在上课期间使用手机便会没收手机。

注:911” 是美国的紧急求救电话的号码,自1968年起开始使用,相当于中国的110。而今,美国大约50%的国土面积上已接通了911号码,其中95%是加强版系统,可提供每个呼叫者的姓名与位置信息。目前,美国人每天呼叫911号码的次数达到285000次,其中大约80%呼叫联系的是警察局。此外,世界各国求救电话号码不尽相同,如中国、日本、德国和印度的是110,美国和加拿大的是911,英国、马来西亚、新加坡、爱尔兰和中国香港的是999,韩国、丹麦、瑞典和芬兰的是112,澳大利亚和中国澳门的是000

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